Abuse of Power: Dr. Glen Gabbard

Posted By on Jul 18, 2016 |


Have you ever wondered what successful people know that you don't? For over twenty years, I have worked with people to help clarify what keeps them stuck or struggling and move them forward in ways they never thought possible. Challenge Your Thinking Podcast is a natural outgrowth of my practice which is about helping you to find ways to overcome obstacles or challenges that stand in your way. If you are interested in making major shifts in your life, business or relationships let's talk.

Whether or not you have personally experienced a boundary violation or an abuse of power, it is important to know how easily and quickly the lines of trust and intimacy can be blurred. The most important thing we can do when that happens is seek out consultation with another therapist, trusted friend, HR department, or mentor.

Dr. Glen Gabbard is a renowned psychiatrist and psychiatric educator whose research has been invaluable in the mental health field and elsewhere. He is also here to talk with us about how an abuse of power that can happen at work, in the church or any institute or organization that runs hierarchically.

At its best, the relationship between a patient and psychotherapist should be a safe one where learning, personal growth and healing can happen. In some ways we could say something similar about working for a company where we have a manager that supervises our successes and/or our failures. That is why Dr. Glen Gabbard’s research, counsel and writing about blurred boundaries is so important in our everyday lives.

Dr. Gabbard emphasizes the importance of talking through even our most difficult emotions with someone we trust before they grow beyond our control, because isolation only pushes you further towards feeling unnecessary shame. His message is for all of us, because the moment we believe we’re infallible, we’re bound to make mistakes. We hope you’ll join us to hear how Dr. Gabbard’s research shows us that:

  • Isolation can often perpetuate poor judgement calls.
  • We all have the potential to be masters in self-deception.
  • Even with intellectual knowledge, one can enter into a self-deception process where one is doing things that ordinarily one would never do.
  • Holding out for a therapist who displays a strong sense of boundaries is well-worth the wait and effort.

Show Notes